Anonymous asked: "are you not doing recaps for 3b for some reason?"

we’re…on indefinite hiatus :( sorry!

clockworkisaac asked: "Hi! I'm sorry for bothering you, but I was reading your post (the respons to the question from the teenwolf tumblr) and I was wondering what you meant by this: "Give more insight into behind-the-scenes decisionmaking and the practical reasons for not telling certain actors that their characters are secretly evil or going to die." Which actors/characters were you talking about?"

Sorry it took us three weeks to get back to you! We’ve been totally swamped with stuff lately and we’re taking a break from The Bite. Anyway, that line (in this post) was referring to Jill Wagner, Melissa Ponzio, and Haley Webb. This is just the information we have, so we could be wrong! But here’s the stuff we heard that made us include that bit in the post:

Jill Wagner wasn’t looking for other work because she thought she would be on Teen Wolf for a while and didn’t know Kate was going to die until she read the script. Jeff joked about this in an interview or at a panel somewhere (possibly Comic Con?) and said “I thought she knew! If your character is a bad guy, you’re not gonna make it.” This prompted a discussion of the “bad guys” who are still alive: Peter, Deucalion, Gerard, Ethan, and Aiden…all of whom are male (and white).

Melissa Ponzio heard about what happened to Jill and was convinced the same thing would happen to her. Once Stiles told the Sheriff about werewolves, she thought her character would become redundant and be killed off. Apparently Linden Ashby mentioned all this in an interview because Melissa had relayed it to him.

Of course, sometimes actors don’t want to know everything about their characters! Melissa Ponzio herself has said she’s okay with not knowing the reason why Melissa McCall’s husband left her. She says, “I want to keep it a surprise. I want it to be, as we slowly peel back the onion, for me to realize as Melissa the person and also the character Melissa what happened. I want to honor that. I don’t want to sit on it. I want it to be fresh, and if it’s angry or if it’s sad or if it’s still raw, I really want to feel that in the moment.” So there are definitely times when it’s advantageous to keep certain information about the characters a secret and not tell the actors. But as an actor, knowing whether or not your character is going to die (aka whether or not you’re still going to have a job!) is very important, and it’s also important to know what your character’s motivations are, because if you don’t know your character is secretly evil, that’s going to change how you play them.

Haley Webb knew she only signed on for a certain number of episodes but she did not know Jennifer was going to be the Darach, so she couldn’t make any acting choices in earlier episodes to signify that there might be something going on underneath the surface. Haley didn’t know Jennifer was the Darach when she and Hoechlin were shooting the sex scene in the loft, so if Jennifer really did have seductive magic that she used to coerce Derek (which still hasn’t been confirmed or denied) then basically she agreed to shoot a sex scene without being told it was actually a rape scene. If that’s what happened, it’s a pretty unusual thing to ask an actor to do.

So it would be really interesting if Jeff could shed some light on his decisionmaking process and the reasons behind these particular choices. Of course, we’re four episodes into 3B and so far it doesn’t look like either Wolf Watch or the online aftershow is actually going to cover any of the topics we suggested, but there’s still a tiny glimmer of hope they might address some of them.

"What is significant about fan fiction is that it often spins the kind of stories that showrunners wouldn’t think to tell, because fanficcers often come from a different demographic. The discomfort seems to be not that the shows are being reinterpreted by fans, but that they are being reinterpreted by the wrong sorts of fans - women, people of colour, queer kids, horny teenagers, people who are not professional writers, people who actually care about continuity (sorry). The proper way for cultural mythmaking to progress, it is implied, is for privileged men to recreate the works of privileged men from previous generations whilst everyone else listens quietly. That’s how it’s always been done. That’s how it should be done in the future, whatever Tumblr says.
But time can be rewritten. Myths can bend and change. Something new and exciting is happening in the world of storytelling, and fans are an important part of it."
— Laurie Penny [x]

campinginpurgatory:

No, but we really need to talk more about Lydia’s screaming, because what they’ve done with that is so fucking incredible.

In most American horror films, the sole province of the woman is to scream bloody murder, and then die. Jamie Lee Curtis, the first Final Girl of the slasher genre, made a name for herself: The Scream Queen. She was allowed to survive, as the Final Girl, but she also had to scream and be terrified. Even in the supposedly “feminist” and “postmodern” horror films of the 90s and beyond, in which the Final Girl does not always have to be a virgin and women often has as much or more agency than the men, there is still at least one token girl—usually a conventionally attractive, popular, promiscuous white girl—whose only function is to be “slutty” and “vivacious” for the first ten minutes of the movie before running, screaming her head off, and dying gruesomely in the first wave of victims. This girl is usually juxtaposed against the Final Girl in these films, who is written as “level-headed” and “resourceful” and “intelligent” by comparison. Meaning she moves, and acts, and gets shit done. She doesn’t scream. She doesn’t express her fear, because to express fear when you’re a character in a horror film is to show your “feminine” weakness, and to mark yourself for death.

So into this landscape of horror tropes comes Lydia Martin. I honestly had her pegged as monster bait from episode one, because I never expected a show called Teen Wolf that airs on MTV to its genre’s tropes, twist them up, and then remake them into new and wonderful things the way this show has. Especially since, at first blush, Lydia is the consummate “slutty girl who dies first.”

Lydia is sexually active and proud of it. She’s outspoken, popular, conventionally pretty, seemingly shameless and shallow…I was absolutely certain she’d be dead before season one, probably as a prompt for a revenge-and-manpain storyline involving Jackson. But no. First of all, Lydia is smart as fuck. She’s probably smarter than anyone else on the show. Not only that, but she’s especially smart at and interested in math and science—two subjects (along with film, weirdly enough) that are usually reserved for the Nerdy Guy in horror, while the Nerdy Girl is almost always a bookworm who knows a lot of things about history, art, and literature. And she’s not nearly as shallow and one-dimensional as she first appears, either, as shown in the incredible parent-teacher night sequence from season one episode “The Tell.”

Outspoken, popular, sexually active and proud of it, smart as fuck with hidden depths…already they’ve taken that stereotype and twisted it around a bit.

But then they shattered it. Completely. Because they made Lydia a survivor instead of a victim. And they turned her ear-shattering screaming—usually the last sound a girl makes in the horror genre—from a symbol of weakness into an instrument of power. Screaming clears Lydia’s head and allows her to use her intuitive powers. When Lydia screams, it does not signal that she is about to die. In fact, she sounds the warning of death for those around her. Nor is her screaming the emotional reaction of an irrational teenage girl who can’t defend herself or escape the gruesome end that’s coming for her. When Lydia screams, the world freezes and fucking listens.

It’s just…fan-fucking-tastic.

sophielostandfound:

swingsetindecember:

sterekism:

characterdevelopmentwrites:

lycanthropique:

cryssreed:

stiles’ shirt changes and then changes back mid scene (x)

i would probably be really fascinated by this and coming up with all kinds of theories about what it means if it weren’t for the fact that that’s exactly what i did with the vanishing dead body at the pool in 3a only to discover that it was just a continuity error/editing gaffe

there’s a really large chance they filmed the scene twice, most likely on different days, so he’s wearing the one shirt one day and another shirt a different day and when they edited the best parts together, they got mixed up and they didn’t care to fix it like they re-used footage of scott jumping across the two cliffs or w/e from s2 in 3b like they’re not exactly the most attentive/unlazy people in the world imo

but guys, that would mean they did that with scenes in every episode so far. the shirt shows up in 3x13, 3x14 and 3x15. One error I can understand, 3 in a row is suspicious. Perhaps intentional.

or continuity is still shitty and a shirt ripped like that shirt in season 2 at the sheriff’s office 

seriously, the meta peeps have been doing on the shirts is so fucking beautiful, but you have to consider Occam’s razor, and that the simplest explanation, that of a continuity goof, may be it. especially taking into account the track record of the show to date

shepardtaichou:

there’s a really big difference between “the writers want to put these two characters in a queer relationship but can’t because of censors” and “we’re going to keep putting these characters in queer situations and playing it off as a really funny joke”

tifferini:

Dreams, they feel real while we’re in them, right? It’s only when we wake up that we realise that something was actually strange.

softlycanthropy:

"anchors" in motifs :: doors :: "when is a door not a door? when it’s ajar."

A door is first and foremost an entrance. On a literal level a door usually leads to the inside of something, be it a house, building, or other structure. Within a structure itself a door serves as both an entrance and exit to other rooms, a passageway between rooms, and an exit from the structure. On a metaphorical level, a door can become an entrance to nearly anything, but it is most commonly used to symbolize the entrance to another world. ( x )

Half-open doors are common symbolism used in roman sepulchral  monuments (tombs). In 17th century painting, the door became a topos (traditional theme). It appeared as a prominent motif in Dutch painting, specifically, in its separation and connection of two adjacent interior spaces. In the back of the image, one sees a mirror by which both the person in front of it and the viewers themselves can notice the off-screen space behind them, on the other side of the open doors, by means of mirrors. Doors also put put up barriers, in order to create distance between the viewer and the characters, refusing total identification and enabling moral judgment. ( x )

#on a metaphorical level there were so many doors shown opening and closing #which they can usually cut out for the sake of precision #but since it was very pervasive i believe it was done purposefully (artfully) #teen wolf is filmed very beautifully and it’s done in the vein to push the storyline forward??? #so all these doors #as well as the ones we know that are opened within stiles scott and allison…. #which ones are opened and which ones are closed? #which events are factual and which are purely in their subconscious?? #are there doors within doors within doors where there are dreams within dreams within dreams??? #which should they open and which should they close?? #when they open a door and enter a room (or close a door and exit a room) #is it symbolic of an exploration of their darkness-shrouded minds???? #i think we should all pay close attention because i’m not sure the characters even know (x)

swingsetindecember:

lycanthropique:

I was bored so I decided to transcribe this writing on the chalkboard in the classroom where Stiles takes Scott when he can’t control his shift at school.

"HESXPRNO DTLSRWEV VUMIS DHLEMBQJS MGMXL-QOV HM DALC
ICFTMLV- CAGQZTUO FOXQERA TARDW AKFBRCAE?
SLBZXO AER INCWGRTHB NAQBLFBUS CLUPAS
OBCVGRFTUS GLEIPEXA ZMVERH”
-PWFTIDAG DRIME DQE HOKE

That last P is written backwards, but I’m assuming it’s meant to be a P just as I’m assuming the backwards F in FOXQERA is indeed an F, and a few other letters. None of these letters have other meanings when they’re backwards as far as I know (although the backwards R makes the “ya” sound in the Cyrillic alphabet, and on its own as a word it means the article “I” in Russian.)
I’m also assuming the scrambling of the letters is the same here as it was for Stiles’ history book. The title “ALLIES AND AXIS: WORLD WAR II AND THE INTERNATIONAL STRUGGLE FOR POWER” was converted to “DALESI XIS ANLA: DOL WTAR I AWND RHIE WUITENRRIENLA SAOTRGLE FGO TPONE” which doesn’t appear to be any sort of code, just a jumble that’s meant to mimic dyslexia/alexia. I don’t think it’s a simple substitution cipher or a transposition cipher.
The text above looks like a quote, and if so, that last line after the closing quotation mark is probably the name of the person the quote is attributed to. So maybe a famous writer or scholar’s name is hidden in the letters PWFTIDAG DRIME DQE HOKE.
I think Stiles’ difficulty reading and processing information is supposed to be symbolic, and since this is Teen Wolf, whatever clue or message is in this quote is likely to just raise more questions, not give us any concrete answers. Still, if someone wants to take a crack at figuring it out what it says, that would be cool!

man, it’s always a quote
jeff davis must have a quote a day calendar

swingsetindecember:

lycanthropique:

I was bored so I decided to transcribe this writing on the chalkboard in the classroom where Stiles takes Scott when he can’t control his shift at school.

"HESXPRNO DTLSRWEV VUMIS DHLEMBQJS MGMXL-QOV HM DALC

ICFTMLV- CAGQZTUO FOXQERA TARDW AKFBRCAE?

SLBZXO AER INCWGRTHB NAQBLFBUS CLUPAS

OBCVGRFTUS GLEIPEXA ZMVERH”

-PWFTIDAG DRIME DQE HOKE

That last P is written backwards, but I’m assuming it’s meant to be a P just as I’m assuming the backwards F in FOXQERA is indeed an F, and a few other letters. None of these letters have other meanings when they’re backwards as far as I know (although the backwards R makes the “ya” sound in the Cyrillic alphabet, and on its own as a word it means the article “I” in Russian.)

I’m also assuming the scrambling of the letters is the same here as it was for Stiles’ history book. The title “ALLIES AND AXIS: WORLD WAR II AND THE INTERNATIONAL STRUGGLE FOR POWER” was converted to “DALESI XIS ANLA: DOL WTAR I AWND RHIE WUITENRRIENLA SAOTRGLE FGO TPONE” which doesn’t appear to be any sort of code, just a jumble that’s meant to mimic dyslexia/alexia. I don’t think it’s a simple substitution cipher or a transposition cipher.

The text above looks like a quote, and if so, that last line after the closing quotation mark is probably the name of the person the quote is attributed to. So maybe a famous writer or scholar’s name is hidden in the letters PWFTIDAG DRIME DQE HOKE.

I think Stiles’ difficulty reading and processing information is supposed to be symbolic, and since this is Teen Wolf, whatever clue or message is in this quote is likely to just raise more questions, not give us any concrete answers. Still, if someone wants to take a crack at figuring it out what it says, that would be cool!

man, it’s always a quote

jeff davis must have a quote a day calendar

swingsetindecember:

honeybearbee:

do i detect some shade at a certain someone?
i think i do~

keahu kahuanui deserves better than the way teen wolf treats him

swingsetindecember:

honeybearbee:

do i detect some shade at a certain someone?

i think i do~

keahu kahuanui deserves better than the way teen wolf treats him

Teen Wolf + TVTropes

Parental Substitute: A Parental Substitute is an adult friend who fills the children’s lonely life with guidance and (often) love. They guide the child and teach them how to stand on their own feet, how to have fun, and how to not be so bothered by the fact that Mommy or Daddy isn’t around (or ignores them). They often tell the kid they are so proud of you. Usually, by the end of the story, the Parental Substitute leaves as well, but at that point the kid is able to stand on their own two feet.

deludedisthenewreality:

I don’t know guys I have a feeling that the unexpected person that saves Derek and Peter MIGHT BE Meagan Tandy AKA Braeden AKA “The Girl” who saved Isaac in 3A. I don’t know all of this is based off of her beauty mark so and also the fact that she was at the 3b wrap party and took a picture with Hoechlin so.

LOL 

barbeauxbot:

If you ever count up all your favs and they mysteriously all happen to be white dudes (regardless of orientation) it might be time to double check with yourself and question maybe you’re holding the female and non-white characters to a different standard and you’re probably a bigot

andreashettle:

silversarcasm:

Seriously though if you’re writing a story and not a single character is disabled I want you to take a big fucking step back and ask yourself why that is

One in every seven people on the face of the Earth is a person with disabilities. (The World Health Organization and the World Bank say so, http://www.who.int/disabilities/world_report/2011/report/en/).  There are literally thousands of possible diagnostic labels out there associated with zillions of conditions that many people consider a form of “disability”—something that presents unique and pervasive challenges in school, at work, at home, and everywhere else.  Or at least, they present challenges in a world that is predominantly not designed for them. Some individual conditions may be very rare. Other conditions may be pretty common. 

It’s easy for some non-disabled people to think that “I don’t know anyone who is disabled” because they may be erasing everyone whose disability and/or assistive device is not immediately visible (hint: some of the more common disabilities, like autism or attention deficit disorder or dyslexia, are non-apparent if not all the time then frequently).  Many non-disabled people also tend to erase disabilities associated with old age. Have you ever said, “Granny isn’t disabled, she’s just old”.  Um, in what way exactly is her hearing loss for which she wears a hearing aid different from my own hearing “loss”, other than the exact cause of hearing loss and the fact that I was born deaf and she didn’t start losing her hearing until she was 70? 

Trust me. In a world in which one out of every seven people in every country has a disability, you DO know people who have disabilities.  Perhaps you just don’t know who all of them ARE yet, which is not the same thing.

People with disabilities are not some obscure and random entity.  We cut across all national boundaries, all racial groups, all genders, linguistic groups, socioeconomic groups, ages, anything else you can think of. (Which is not to say that there is no age dimension or socioeconomic dimension to disability, etc.—there is.  But there is still no single demographic that is at all “immune” to having members who represent a wide cross-section of disabilities.)

All of this being a long way of saying:

Any fictional work with significantly more than seven characters that DOESN’T have at least ONE character with a disability is depicting a very strange universe that bears no resemblance to ours.

So if you write something with more than seven characters in it, and NONE of them have ANY disability.  I think it’s fair to ask why that is.

Even with fewer than seven characters.  If you write 10 short stories with a total of 35 characters among them—well, in the real world, if you randomly select 35 people from the general population, usually somewhere in the neighborhood of five of them will be people with disabilities.  Sometimes it might be three, sometimes it might be seven, but usually it’ll be in the ballpark of five.  So if you have written 10 short stories with a total of 35 characters among them, and NONE have disabilities.  Then, again, it’s fair to ask WHY.

Or, more importantly. It is fair to start asking, why NOT include people with disabilities in your stories. If you can’t think of a reason why not (other than laziness of imagination, or being intimidated about writing outside your immediate frame of reference, or being intimidated by the idea that you might need to do some research and learning), then maybe it’s time to start including some.

Ditto to all the above for women, for people of color, for LGBT populations, and so forth.

In the real world, only maybe one-third of the US population are white men. (Or at least that’s a number I’ve seen quoted in a recent Tumblr post I think I re-blogged recently, I admit to being too lazy at the moment to go find a real citation for either that blog or the original source.)  If you narrow that further to white men who ALSO are non-disabled, AND hetero sexual AND cissexual (is that spelled cis-sexual or cissexual? The dang spell check keeps trying to tell me that neither one exists :-( ) AND between the ages of 18 and 65 AND from a reasonably well-educated background AND currently has a middle class income.  Well, yes, most of these taken individually are in a majority.  But in each case there is a minority who is consistently erased.  So in each case you have to keep chipping away at what is supposedly the “majority population” until you end up with what is really a very small group indeed.

I haven’t tried doing the math but I’m guessing someone out there has done it (and am hoping someone will be nice enough to point to it).  And I’m guessing that the total number of people who are white, AND male, AND cissexual, AND straight, AND non-disabled, AND all the rest … is probably a lot smaller than many of the population groups who we almost never see represented in most fiction. 

So instead of people from privileged backgrounds always asking, “Why do we need to see people of color, people with disabilities, more strong women characters, LGBT characters, etc. in fiction … in sort, people who aren’t like me?”, we should all be asking, “Why do we have so many characters who represent such a tiny fraction of the real world population? When do other people get to have their turn seeing “people like them” in fiction, too?”